A week not to be forgotten….

…for those of us interested in the right to be forgotten. I’ve found myself writing and talking to people about it unlike any time before. Privacy is becoming bigger and bigger news – and I have a strong feeling that the Snowden revelations influenced the thinking of the ECJ in last week’s ruling, subconsciously if nothing else. That should not be viewed as a bad thing – quite the opposite. What we have learned through Edward Snowden’s information should have been a wake-up call for everyone. Privacy matters – and the links between the commercial gathering and holding of data and the kind of surveillance done by the authorities are complex and manifold. If we care about privacy in relation to anyone – the authorities, businesses, other individuals, advertisers, employers, criminals etc – then we need to build a more privacy-friendly infrastructure that protects us from all of these. That means thinking more deeply, and considering more radical options – and yes, that even means the right to be forgotten, for all its flaws, risks and complications. More thought is needed, and more action – and we must understand the sources of information here, the nature of those contributing to the debate and so forth.

Anyway, this isn’t a ‘real’ blog post about the subject – I’ve done enough of them in the last week. What I want to do here is provide links to what I’ve written and said in the last week, as well as to my academic contributions to the subject, both past and present, and then to link to Julia Powles’ excellent curation of the academic blogs and articles written by many people in the aftermath of the judgment.

Here’s what I’ve written:

For CNN, a summary of the judgment and its implications, written the same day as the judgment.

For the Justice Gap, a day later, looking at the judgment in context and asking whether it was a ‘good’ or a ‘bad’ thing for internet freedom.

My interview for CBC (Canada)’s Day 6 programme – talking about the implications, and examining the right for a non-European audience.

For my own blog, looking at Google’s options for the future and suggesting that the judgment isn’t the end of the world

Also for my own blog, a day later, trying to put the judgment into context – it’s not about paedophiles and politicians, and it won’t be either a triumph or a disaster.

This last piece may in some ways be the most important – because already there’s a huge about of hype being built up, and scare stories are being leaked to the media at a suspiciously fast rate. There are huge lobbies at play here, particularly from the ‘big players’ on the internet like Google, who will face significant disruption and significant costs as a result of the ruling, and seem to want to make sure that people view the conflict as one of principle, rather than one of business. People will rally behind a call to defend freedom of expression much more easily than they will behind a call to defend Google’s right to make money, particularly given Google’s taxation policies.

Then here are my academic pieces on the subject.

‘A right to delete?’ from 2011, for the European Journal of Law and Technology. This is an open access piece, suggesting a different approach.

‘The EU, the US and the Right to be Forgotten’, published in early 2014, a chapter in a Springer Book on data protection reform, arising from the CPDP conference in Brussels 2013. This, unfortunately, is not open access, but a chapter in an expensive book. This does, however, deal directly with some of the lobbying issues.

The right to be forgotten – and my particular take on it, the right to delete, is also discussed at length in my recently released book, Internet Privacy Rights. There’s a whole chapter on the subject, and it’s part of the general theme.

Finally, here’s a link to Julia Powles’ curation of the topic. This is really helpful – a list of what’s been written by academics over the last week or so, with a brief summary of each piece and a link to it. Some of the academics contributing are from the very top of the field,  including Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Daniel Solove and Jonathan Zittrain. All the pieces are worth a read.

This subject is far from clear cut, and the debate will continue on, in a pretty heated form I suspect, for quite some time. Probably the best thing that could come out of it, in my opinion, is some more impetus for the completion of the data protection reform in the EU. This reform has been struggling on for some years, stymied amongst other things by intense lobbying  by Google and others. That lobbying will have to change tack pretty quickly: it’s no longer in Google’s interests for the reform to be delayed. If they want to have a more ‘practical’ version of the right to be forgotten in action, the best way is to be helpful rather than obstructive in the reform of the data protection regime. A new regime, with a well balanced version of the right incorporated, would be in almost everyone’s best interests.

5 thoughts on “A week not to be forgotten….

  1. What you want, philosophically, is not the Right to be Forgotten but the right to renounce yourself. A Right to Change. I fully agree, that should be a moral right that needs to be cultivated, and surrounded by legal protections against discrimination.

    I’ve written many things while I was younger, some of which I fully stand by and some that I renounce. I want that choice. If you bring my old posts back to me from LiveJournal I want to say “yeah, I stand by that”, or “no that was dumb, sorry, I no longer think that way”. Or “that was appropriate for a certain audience and time, which is different from now”.

    I don’t want to erase that past. It would be insincere, futile, and a concession to fear and lying about ourselves. What I want is the Right to Change. I want others to recognise that people change, to judge us as we are now, and not to discriminate based on old behaviours or opinions.

  2. The ruling on the right to be forgotten seems to be just one worrying part in a jigsaw of laws that could come together to suppress free speech.

    For instance, another threat appears to come in the form of a recent European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) ruling on the need to ‘pre-moderate’ articles that might attract too many heated comments – “Given the nature of the article, the company [Delfi] should have expected offensive posts, and exercised an extra degree of caution so as to avoid being held liable for damage to an individual’s reputation.”- via the FT http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9c0cf256-e197-11e3-b7c4-00144feabdc0.html#axzz32YGHasNB.

    By the time liberals wake up to the danger, it will probably be too late.

    @HuwSayer

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