Censorship and surveillance…

Today’s ‘Internet Injunctions’ case in the high court (Cartier vs BSkyB) highlights one of the inherent problems with the kind of ‘porn-blocking’ censorship system that the current government has effectively forced ISPs to comply with: when you build a censorship system for one purpose, you can be pretty certain that it will be used for other purposes. As David Allen Green, who tweets as @JackofKent described it today:

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I’ve argued this before – it’s question five in my ‘10 Questions about Cameron’s ‘new’ porn-blocking‘, but here it is in action, being argued in court. It was inevitable that it was going to be argued. Though people tend to deny it, ‘function creep’ or ‘mission creep’ is a reality, not a dream of the paranoid tin-foil hat brigade.

It’s not an argument restricted to censorship systems – the same applies to surveillance, and should remind us of the links between the two, and the need to oppose both. Just as advocates of censorship start with child-abuse imagery and then move on through ‘ordinary’ porn to other kinds of ‘offensive’ material, and then to copyright infringement, advocates of surveillance start with catching terrorists and paedophiles, through catching more ‘ordinary’ criminals, to finding people who are ‘offensive’ in some other way, through to those suspected (and it is generally based on suspicion, not proof) of infringing copyright. And from there, who knows where?

The links between surveillance and censorship are strong and multifaceted – though the motivation, in the end, is the same: control over people and restriction of freedom. Surveillance can be used to support censorship – watch everyone to see where they’re going, what they’re watching and reading, who they’re meeting, so that you can shut down their websites, close their meetings, track down the people they’re listening to, and so forth. Censorship can be used to support surveillance – particularly with things like the current ‘opt-out’ internet filters, where if you opt-out of censorship, that automatically makes you suspicious, and a target for surveillance. Anyone using a pseudonym, or trying to be anonymous, is already marked down as suspicious – anyone using TOR or an equivalent, for example.

This is one of the many reasons we should reject both censorship and surveillance. We should understand that the two are linked – and that there are slippery slopes associated with both. And they really are slippery, as today’s case in the High Court should help us to see.

For more details of the case, see David Allen Green’s piece for the Open Rights Group here, and the Open Rights Group press release here.

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