what do we know and what should we do about…? internet privacy

My new book, what do we know and what should we do about internet privacy has just been published, by Sage. It is part of a series of books covering a wide range of current topics – the first ones have been on immigrationinequality, the future of work and housing. 

This is a very different kind of book from my first two books – Internet Privacy Rights, and The Internet, Warts and All, both of which are large, relatively serious academic books, published by Cambridge University Press, and sufficiently expensive and academic as to be purchasable only by other academics – or more likely university libraries. The new book is meant for a much more general audience – it is short, written intentionally accessibly, and for sale at less than £10. It’s not a law book – the series is primarily social science, and in many ways I would call the book more sociology than anything else. I was asked to write the book by the excellent Chris Grey – whose Brexit blogs have been vital reading over the last few years – and I was delighted to be asked, because making this subject in particular more accessible has been something I’ve been wanting to do for a long time. Internet privacy has been a subject for geeks and nerds for years – but as this new book tries to show, it’s something that matters more and more for everyone these days.

Cover

It may be a short book (well, it is a short book, well under 100 pages) but it covers a wide range. It starts by setting the context – a brief history of privacy, a brief history of the internet, and then showing how we got from what were optimistic, liberal and free beginnings to the current situation – all-pervading surveillance, government involvement at every level, domination by a few, huge corporations with their own interests at heart. It looks at the key developments along the way – the world-wide-web, search, social networks – and their privacy implications. It then focusses on the biggest ‘new’ issues: location data, health data, facial recognition and other biometrics, the internet of things, and political data and political manipulation. It sketches out how each of these matters significantly – but how the combination of them matters even more, and what it means in terms of our privacy, our autonomy and our future.

The final part of the book – the ‘what should we do about…’ section – is by its nature rather shorter. There is not as much that we can do as many of us would like – as the book outlines, we have reached a position from which it is very difficult to escape. We have built dependencies that are hard to find alternatives to – but not impossible. The book outlines some of the key strategies – from doing our best to extricate ourselves from the disaster that is Facebook to persuading our governments not to follow the current ultimately destructive paths that it seems determined to pursue. Two policies get particular attention: Real Names, which though superficially attractive are ultimately destructive and authoritarian, fail to deal with the issues they claim to and put vulnerable people in more danger, and the current and fundamentally misguided attempts to undermine the effectiveness of encryption.

Can we change? I have to admit this is not a very optimistic book, despite the cheery pink colour of its cover, but it is not completely negative. I hope that the starting point is raising awareness, which is what this book is intended to do.

The book can be purchased directly from Sage here, or via Amazon here, though if you buy it through Amazon, after you’ve read the book you might feel you should have bought it another way!

 

Paul Bernal

February 2020

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